Honorary Awards granted by
The Open University in 2009

Doctor of the University

Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Photo: IoP
Academic and scholarly distinction
Dame Jocelyn is Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford and has a Professorial Fellowship at Mansfield College, Oxford. For ten years she was Professor of Physics at The Open University, and had a year as a Distinguished Visiting Professor at Princeton University, USA. After posts in Southampton and University College London, in the early 1980s Dame Jocelyn worked in infrared astronomy at the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh. Latterly she ran the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in Hawaii as a facility for British, Canadian and Dutch astronomers. She has been President of the Royal Astronomical Society. Dame Jocelyn has been awarded many prizes by learned bodies in the UK and the USA; the Royal Astronomical Society presented her with the Herschel Medal, and she won the Edinburgh Medal for services to science and society in 1999. In 2007 she was made a DBE, and in 2008 she became the first female President of the Institute of Physics (IoP).

Ms Jane Bown
Ms Jane Bown
Photo: Eamonn McCabe
Services to the arts
Born in Dorset, Jane Bown studied photography at Guildford School of Art, Surrey. The Observer published its first Jane Bown photograph in 1949, beginning a romance that still flourishes between Britain's oldest Sunday paper and the country's most loved photographer. Jane's work is immediately recognisable, particularly her penetrating portraits taken over the past 50 years. Sitters have included the Queen, Jean Cocteau, Truman Capote, Samuel Beckett, Sir John Betjeman and The Beatles. Her approach to taking photographs is as refreshingly unpretentious as she is herself – she works quickly and discreetly, using only available light, usually in black and white and without any assistants. In 1985 she was awarded an MBE. Jane has had many exhibitions, her latest being 'Unknown Bown' (2007), which focuses on her photojournalistic and social documentary output between the 1940s and 1960s. Collections include London's National Portrait Gallery and the Palace of Westminster.

Mr Julian Bream
Mr Julian Bream
Services to the arts
Since Julian Bream, guitarist and lutenist, debuted in 1947 at the age of 13, he has been acknowledged as one of the most remarkable artists of the post-war era. After studies at the Royal College of Music, he fulfilled regular engagements on all five continents. Julian Bream's solo guitar recitals have presented an immense variety of compositions from the seventeenth century onwards, but he also inspired profound developments in the contemporary guitar repertoire. He is also renowned for his fervent advocacy of the Elizabethan lute. His recitals and concerts, and his founding of the Julian Bream Consort, offered unprecedented opportunities for audiences to experience early music. With his uniquely diverse range of activities, and a multitude of broadcasts and television appearances, Julian Bream is acknowledged as one of the great recording artists of the twentieth century, winning many international awards. Julian Bream was awarded an OBE in 1964 for services to music, and the CBE in 1985.

Ms Gurinda Chadha
Ms Gurinda Chadha
Photo: Graham Barclay
Public services and Services to the arts
Gurinder Chadha is one of the UK's most proven and respected film makers with a successful track record in directing films that are international box office successes. Her films celebrate the Indian diaspora with humour, affection and heart and have enthralled worldwide audiences for the past 15 years. Bend It Like Beckham is the highest grossing British-financed, British-distributed film ever in the UK box office. The award-winning film was a critical and commercial success internationally, topping the box-office charts in the US, Australia, New Zealand, Switzerland and South Africa. Bride and Prejudice – a film that marries Jane Austen with Indian and Western musicals – is the first film ever to open at number one in the UK and India on the same day. Gurinder has received several honorary doctorates from British universities and was awarded an OBE in 2006 for her services to the British film industry.

Ms Shami Chakrabarti
Ms Shami Chakrabarti
Photo: Gurjit Nahal
Exceptional contribution to education and culture
Shami Chakrabarti has been Director of Liberty (The National Council for Civil Liberties) since September 2003. Shami first joined Liberty as in-house counsel on 10 September 2001. She became heavily involved in its engagement with the 'War on Terror' and with the defence and promotion of human rights values in Parliament, the courts and wider society. A barrister by background, Shami Chakrabarti was called to the Bar in 1994 and worked as a lawyer in the Home Office from 1996 until 2001, for governments of both persuasions. Since becoming Liberty's Director, Shami Chakrabarti has written, spoken and broadcast widely on the importance of the human rights framework as an essential component of democratic society. She is Chancellor of Oxford Brookes University, a governor of the London School of Economics and the British Film Institute, a Visiting Fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford and a Master of the Bench of Middle Temple.

Mr Roddy Doyle
Mr Roddy Doyle
Services to the arts
Roddy Doyle was born in Dublin in 1958. He has written eight novels, including The Commitments; Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, which won the Booker Prize in 1993; and The Woman Who Walked Into Doors. His books for children include The Giggler Treatment and Wilderness. Roddy has also written for the stage, most recently a new version of The Playboy of the Western World, which he co-wrote with Bisi Adigun, and which was produced by the Abbey Theatre in 2007 and again in 2008. Roddy has written the scripts for several films, including The Commitments, co-written with Dick Clement and Ian LaFrenais, which was directed by Alan Parker and released in 1991. He wrote the BBC series, Family (1994). His memoir of his parents, Rory & Ita was published in 2002. His most recent book is The Deportees, a collection of short stories. He lives and works in Dublin.

Doctor of the University

Dr John Drysdale
Dr John Drysdale
Services to the University
Educated at Oxford University, John Drysdale qualified as a chartered accountant in Scotland. He had a long career as a merchant banker, working for 30 years with Robert Fleming, gaining wide experience of banking operations worldwide. He became a director of the bank with special interests in the Far East and Middle East.
Having retired in 1996, John Drysdale joined the Board of Transparency International (UK) in 2002, and became its Chairman in 2007. He is also a member of the international audit committee of this non-governmental organisation, which is based in Berlin, Germany. Transparency International is dedicated to combating corruption; John has a particular interest in the subject, especially in relation to its effects on the defence, construction and financial sectors. He was Chairman of The Open University Foundation, retiring in 2006, and has a doctorate in musicology. He is a director of Garsington Opera in Oxfordshire.

Professor Carol Ann Duffy
Professor Carol Ann Duffy
Photo: Michael Woods
Services to the arts
Carol Ann was born in Glasgow and grew up in Stafford. She read philosophy at the University of Liverpool, graduating in 1977, since when she has published over thirty books, including poetry for children and adults, fairy tales and numerous anthologies. These include Mean Time, The World's Wife and Rapture. Carol Ann's work has received every major poetry award, including the Whitbread Poetry Award and the Forward Poetry Prize in 1993; the TS Eliot Poetry Prize in 2001; and the Signal Award for children's poetry in 1997 and 2001. She received an OBE in 1995 and a CBE in 2001 for services to poetry and became a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1999. She is also an acclaimed playwright, a former editor of the poetry magazine Ambit and is a regular reviewer and broadcaster. Carol Ann is Professor and Creative Director of The Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Mr Elliot Grove
Mr Elliot Grove
Exceptional contribution to education and culture
Elliot Grove founded the Raindance Film Festival in 1993, the British Independent Film Awards in 1998 and Raindance.TV in 2007, all devoted to independent filmmaking and its emerging talent. Elliot has produced over one hundred and fifty short films, and five feature films. He haswritten eight scripts, one of which is currently in pre-production. His first feature film, Table 5, was shot on thirty-five millimetre film and was completed for less than three hundred pounds. Elliot teaches writers and producers in the UK, Europe, Japan and America. He has written two books, which have since become industry standards: Raindance Writers' Lab: Write + Sell the Hot Screenplay and Raindance Producers' Lab: Lo-To-No Budget Filmmaking, both published by Focal Press. His third book, Beginning Filmmaking: 100 Easy steps from script to screen, is to be published this year, and he has written his first novel, The Bandit Queen.

Dr Adam Hart-Davis
Dr Adam Hart-Davis
Exceptional contribution to education and culture
Adam Hart-Davis is a freelance photographer, writer and broadcaster– presenter on television shows such as Local Heroes, Tomorrow's World, What the Romans [and others] Did for Us, Science Shack and many others, winning various awards. He has written many books, including Thunder, Flush and Thomas Crapper: An Encycloopedia and Amazing Math Puzzles. His latest books are Why Does a Ball Bounce?, Taking the Piss, Just Another Day and The Cosmos: a beginner's guide.
Honorary Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Society of Dyers and Colourists, and Merton College Oxford, and patron of a dozen charitable organisations, Adam has collected 13 honorary doctorates, the Horace Hockley Award from the Institute of Scientific and Technical Communicators, a medal from the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Sir Henry Royce Memorial Medal from the Institute of Incorporated Engineers, and the 1999 Gerald Frewer memorial trophy of the Council of Engineering Designers.

Sir Mark Elder
Sir Mark Elder
Photo: Sheila Rock
Services to the arts
Sir Mark Elder is Music Director of the Hallé and works regularly with the world's leading symphony orchestras. In the UK he enjoys close associations with the London Philharmonic and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. He was Music Director of English National Opera from 1979 to 1993, and has been Principal Guest Conductor of the BBC Symphony and City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestras. Sir Mark has appeared annually at the Proms in London for many years, including twice at the 'Last Night', and from 2003 with the Hallé. Sir Mark appears regularly in many of the most prominent international opera houses, and was the first British conductor to conduct a new production at the Bayreuth Festival. He has made many recordings with orchestras. Sir Mark was knighted in 2008 and was awarded the CBE in 1989. In May 2006 he was named Conductor of the Year by the Royal Philharmonic Society.

Mr Frank Gardner
Mr Frank Gardner
Services to the arts and Exceptional contribution to education and culture
Frank Gardner is the BBC's first full-time security correspondent, reporting for television, radio and online on issues of both international and UK security.
Frank gained a degree in Arabic and Islamic Studies from Exeter University and was an investment banker before becoming the BBC's Middle East correspondent in Cairo. In 2004 he was shot six times at close range by Al-Qaeda gunmen while filming in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia but survived with major injuries. Frank has reported first-hand on terrorism and security from all over the world. He has given evidence to various UK parliamentary select committees on the conduct of the War on Terrorism. Frank was awarded the OBE in 2005 for services to journalism, the McWhirter Award for Bravery, Spain's El Mundo Prize for International Journalism and voted Person of the Year by the Press Gazette. His bestseller Blood and Sand, describing Frank's
Middle Eastern experiences, was published in 2006.

Ms Kate Humble
Ms Kate Humble
Photo: United Agents
Work in areas of special educational concern to the University
Between two stints travelling around Africa, Kate Humble worked in television production companies, eventually becoming a producer. In 1997 she joined the BBC, working first on the long-running series Animal Hospital and then The Holiday Programme. In 1999 she left to travel through the Sahara desert on foot and camel with salt traders. On her return she continued presenting programmes for the BBC, including The Essential Guide to Rocks, Tomorrow's World, Animal Park and Rough Science. With the BBC's Natural History Unit, Kate dived in a submarine in the Cayman Islands for The Abyss. Beyond the Abyss followed, as well as Wild in Your Garden with Bill Oddie. The immensely popular and successful Springwatch followed, along with Amazon Abyss, Wild in Africa and Seawatch. Kate contributes to several magazines and newspapers, is co-author of the Springwatch and Autumnwatch book, and presents a number of science and natural history programmes for the BBC.

Mr Neil Jordan
Mr Neil Jordan
Services to the arts
Acclaimed filmmaker Neil Jordan has written and directed some of the most provocative and socially topical films in modern cinema including The Company of Wolves, Mona Lisa and many others. In 1992, The Crying Game gained Jordan an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. The success of Interview with the Vampire enabled Jordan to find financing for Michael Collins, a long-cherished project, which won the Golden Lion for Best Film at the Venice Film Festival. His adaptation, with Pat McCabe, of McCabe's novel The Butcher Boy won him a Best Director award at the 1997 Berlin Film Festival. In 1999 he directed his own adaptation of Graham Greene's The End of the Affair, for which he won the BAFTA for Best Adapted Screenplay. Jordan's early career began as a writer, winning The Guardian Fiction Prize in 1974 for Night in Tunisia. He has since published four novels, the latest being Shade (2004).

Professor Peter Hennessy
Professor Peter Hennessy
Academic and scholarly distinction
Peter Hennessy is Attlee Professor of Contemporary British History at Queen Mary, University of London. Previously he was a journalist on The Times, the Financial Times, and The Economist and a presenter of the BBC Radio 4 Analysis programme. Peter is working on a five-part history of Britain since World War Two, of which two volumes, Never Again: Britain 194551 and Never So Good: Britain in the fifties, have been published, with a third, No Satisfaction: Britain in the sixties, under way. His other books include Cabinet; Whitehall; The Secret State: Whitehall and the Cold War; Cabinets and the Bomb and The Prime Minister: the office and its holders since 1945, of which a new edition will appear shortly. Peter is an honorary fellow of the London School of Economics and St Benet's Hall, Oxford. He was elected a fellow of the British Academy in 2003. He won the 2006 Orwell Prize for Political Writing.

Dame Kelly Holmes
Dame Kelly Holmes
Photo: Linda Nylind
Exceptional contribution to education and culture
Dame Kelly Holmes secured her place in British history by becoming the first-ever British athlete to win both the 800 and 1500 metres in the 2004 Olympic Games. Kelly has since gained many awards and accolades, including BBC Sports Personality of the Year, European Athlete of the Year, the prestigious title of the Laureus World Sports Woman of the Year and in 2005 a damehood. Kelly continues to strive for excellence in all that she does and was appointed as the National School Sport Champion in 2006 by the government, which has given her the chance to see first-hand the immense talent the youth of this country has to offer. Recognising the need to nurture and develop this talent, Kelly has gone on to set up the Dame Kelly Holmes Legacy Trust, which will harness the expertise of retired sporting champions and realise the talent in others.

Mr William Roe
Mr William Roe
Services to the educationally underprivileged
William Roe is Chair of Skills Development Scotland, the Scottish government agency created in 2008 to give Scotland's future workforce a competitive edge in the 21st century economy. He is Scotland Commissioner on the UK Commission for Employment and Skills. He is also Chair of Highlands and Islands Enterprise, the regional economic and community development agency for the north-western half of Scotland. He is a non-executive Director of the Pension, Disability and Carers Service of the Department for Work and Pensions. Beyond his work for the Scottish and UK governments, he is Chair of a consulting company, Rocket Science UK Ltd, which has teams based in London, Newcastle and Edinburgh, specialising in public service improvement and innovation. At earlier stages in his life he managed a 15-country EU programme to tackle long-term unemployment, co-created several social enterprises in housing, poverty and community development, and ran further education classes for young offenders in prison.

Doctor of the University

Dame Fiona Reynolds
Dame Fiona Reynolds
Exceptional contribution to education and culture
Dame Fiona has been Director-General of the National Trust for England, Wales and Northern Ireland since 2001. The Trust is one of the world's most fascinating and effective charities, fulfilling its responsibilities to 'look after special places for ever, for everyone'. Fiona has led the Trust successfully through a period of significant change, including a major staff restructuring, realignment of regional boundaries, relocation of central staff to a 'green' office in Swindon, a strategic financial review, and a major overhaul of the charity's governance, with a new structure that has been described by the Charity Commission as exemplary. Fiona has a Masters in land economy from Cambridge University. Before arriving at the Trust, she had a long career in the voluntary conservation movement and a short spell in the Cabinet Office as Director of the Women's Unit from 1998 to 2000. Fiona was awarded a DBE in 2008 for her services to heritage conservation.

Ms Angela Mason
Ms Angela Mason
Public services
Angela Mason has a long history of involvement with the struggle for equality as an activist, lobbyist and civil servant. She was involved in the early women's liberation movement and the Gay Liberation Front and was Executive Director of Stonewall, the lesbian and gay group, from 1992 to 2002, leading many campaigns for lesbian and gay rights. In 2003 Angela was appointed as Head of the Women and Equality Unit in government, where she was responsible for the legislation introducing civil partnerships, and the Equality Act, setting up the new Equality and Human Rights Commission. Angela is now a National Adviser for Equalities and Cohesion at the Improvement and Development Agency for local government and is Chair of the Fawcett Society, the largest national women's organisation campaigning for women's rights. Angela was awarded an OBE in 2000 for services to homosexual rights and a CBE in 2007 for services to equality.

Mr Roger McGough
Mr Roger McGough
Photo: Leila Romaya/Paul Mcann
Services to the arts
Roger McGough is the author of over fifty books of poetry for adults and children, and has edited numerous anthologies. During the 1960s he was
part of Scaffold, whose song Lily the Pink was a hit worldwide. The collection The Mersey Sound has recently been republished in the Penguin Modern Classic series. The winner of two BAFTAs for his film work and a Royal Television Society award, Roger helped write the script for the Yellow Submarine animation film. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, he is twice winner of the Signal and CLPE awards for his books of poetry for children. Roger is an honorary professor of Thames Valley University, a fellow of John Moores University, Liverpool and has three honorary degrees. He was made a freeman of the City of Liverpool in 2001, and received a CBE from the Queen in 2004 for services to literature. Currently he presents Poetry Please on BBC Radio 4.

Professor Joyce Tait
Professor Joyce Tait
Academic and scholarly distinction and Services to the University
Joyce Tait is Scientific Adviser of Innogen, the Economic and Social Research Council's centre for research on innovation in genomics and its social and economic implications. A professor at the University of Edinburgh, she worked for 12 years in the Technology Faculty at The Open University. Joyce has an interdisciplinary background in natural and social sciences covering technology development strategies in the chemical and life science industries, including agro-biotechnology and pharmaceuticals; translational medicine; governance, risk assessment and regulation; policy analysis; stakeholder attitudes and influences; and science and risk communication. Joyce is a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and also of the Society for Risk Analysis. She is a member of the Scottish Stem Cell Network board, the Governing Council of the Roslin Institute, the Scottish Science Advisory Council and the Scientific and Technical Council of the International Risk Governance Council in Geneva, Switzerland. She was awarded the CBE in 2005 for services to social science.

Doctor of the University

Dame Stephanie Shirley
Dame Stephanie Shirley
Services to the educationally underprivileged
Dame Stephanie Shirley arrived in Britain as an unaccompanied child refugee in 1939 and studied for a degree in mathematics at evening classes, with some day release. In 1962 – and with all of six pounds – she founded an early software house as a twentieth-century cottage industry for women, and has an ongoing active involvement with numerous technological and social developments. Her company eventually became very successful and 'Steve', as she had learnt to call herself, has given away over fifty million pounds to pioneering, strategic projects in information technology and autism – her late son's disorder. These include the Oxford Internet Institute, the Kingwood support service for adults with autism, the ground-breaking Prior's Court School for pupils with autism, Wirral Autistic Society and numerous academic projects related to autism and Asperger's syndrome. Dame Stephanie currently chairs Autism Speaks, which raises funds for medical research into the causes of autism.

Mr Anthony Sale
Mr Anthony Sale
Exceptional contribution to education and culture
After careers in the RAF, Marconi and MI5, in 1968 Tony started his own computer software company, Alpha Systems, which he ran with his wife, Margaret, for 12 years. He was then Technical Director at the British Computer Society, followed by four years at the Science Museum in London restoring early computers, where he also started the Computer Conservation Society. In 1991 he joined the successful efforts to save Bletchley Park, subsequently becoming secretary to the Bletchley Park Trust and later the first Museums Director. This gave him the opportunity to rebuild the World War Two Colossus computer. He started in 1994 and, although Colossus is now mostly working, more still needs to be done. He was awarded an honorary fellowship of the British Computer Society in 1996. He is currently involved, as a director and trustee, with setting up the National Museum of Computing in Block H, the home of Colossus, in Bletchley Park.

Professor Gita Sen
Professor Gita Sen
Academic and scholarly distinction and Public services
Gita Sen is Professor of Public Policy at the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore, India and Adjunct Professor of Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard University. She received her doctorate in economics from Stanford University. Gita is a development economist whose research focuses on gender and development. Recent work includes research and policy advocacy on the equity dimensions of health, the gender dimensions of population policies, and the gender implications of globalisation and economic liberalisation. As a founding member of the south-based network Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN), Gita has strong links to many organisations worldwide. She has been a member of, or chaired, many committees and boards concerned with gender and development. Among many awards and honours, Gita received the Volvo Environment Prize in 1994, and has honorary doctorates from the University of East Anglia and from the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.

Mr Terry Waite
Mr Terry Waite
Exceptional contribution to education and culture
After travelling extensively as an education adviser and international consultant, in the early 1980s, Terry Waite, as adviser to the Archbishop of Canterbury, successfully negotiated the release of several hostages from Iran. In 1983 he won the release of British hostages in Libya. In 1987, while negotiating for the release of Western hostages in Lebanon, he was taken captive for nearly five years, the first four of which were spent in solitary confinement. Following Terry's release in 1991, he wrote his first book, the international bestseller Taken on Trust. Other books are Footfalls in Memory (1995) and Travels with a Primate (2000). He is in constant demand as a lecturer, writer and broadcaster worldwide. He is involved with many charities and organisations that support prisoners and the disadvantaged, including Y Care International, the Butler Trust and Emmaus UK. He has received numerous awards, including an MBE and CBE, and has been awarded several honorary doctorates.

Lord Wallace of Tankerness
Lord Wallace of Tankerness
Public services
Jim Wallace practiced as an advocate before being elected in 1983, aged 28, as Member of Parliament for Orkney and Shetland, a seat he held until 2001. He was a major player in the Scottish Constitutional Convention which drew up the blueprint for devolution and in 1999 he became Member of the Scottish Parliament for Orkney. He was appointed Deputy First Minister, and was Minister for Justice and then Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning. He stood down from the Scottish Parliament in 2007, to use his knowledge and skills in consultancy, mainly in the areas of public affairs and alternative energy, and in a voluntary capacity. He is a member of The Open University Scottish External Advisory Committee, Chair of Relationship Scotland, member of the Calman Commission, Honorary Professor at Heriot Watt University and serves on Church of Scotland committees. He was appointed to the House of Lords in 2007.

Sir Mark Tully
Sir Mark Tully
Exceptional contribution to education and culture
Sir Mark Tully was born in India and educated at Trinity Hall, Cambridge. He joined the BBC in 1964, before moving to New Delhi as India Correspondent the following year. He was South Asia Correspondent for 22 years, until becoming a freelance broadcaster and writer in 1994. Sir Mark's books include Amritsar: Mrs Gandhi'sLast Battle (with Satish Jacob, 1985), Raj toRajiv (with Zareer Masani, 1988), No Full Stops in India (1985), The Heart of India (1995), Lives of Jesus (1996) and India in Slow Motion (2002). Sir Mark received the BAFTA Dimbleby Award in 1985 and a Sony radio documentary award in 1992. Honours include an OBE in 1985 and a knighthood in 2002. The President of India awarded him the Padma Shri in 1992 and the Padma Bhushan in 2004, a rare distinction for a non-Indian. Sir Mark is an honorary fellow of Trinity Hall, Cambridge and has received several honorary doctorates.

Mr Brendan Tuohy
Mr Brendan Tuohy
Exceptional contribution to education and culture
Brendan Tuohy has a civil engineering degree from University College Cork and postgraduate qualifications in environmental engineering and management from Dublin University, Trinity College in addition to a Masters in strategic management from Dublin University. Brendan was Secretary General of the Department of Communications, Marine and Natural Resources from 2000 until he retired in 2007. Previously he was Secretary General of the Department of Public Enterprise. Brendan served as a member of the National Economic and Social Council, as Vice-Chair of the United Nations Task Force on Information and Communications Technology for Development and as a member of the United Nations Millennium Project Task Force 10 on science, technology and innovation. He is a founder and current Chair of the UN body, the Global eSchools and Communities Initiative, and chairs the National Maritime College of Ireland Advisory Board. He is a fellow of the Institution of Engineers of Ireland.

Doctor of the University

Mr Anthony Frost
Mr Anthony Frost
Services to the arts
Anthony Frost was born in St Ives, Cornwall, and attended Cardiff School of Art. In 1990, he was prize winner in the South West Open exhibition, and
was also commissioned to produce the cover for The Fall's album Extricate, as well as the stage backdrop for their world tour. In 2000, the Eden Project commissioned Anthony to produce a spectacular planting design for the Fodder Crops exhibit, a living, growing painting. His work is in collections in the Kasser Foundation, New York; John Moores, Liverpool; Limerick Museum, Ireland; The Whitworth, Manchester; King's College Cambridge and the Bank of America. Anthony's work has been reproduced by UNESCO for education, science, culture and communication for a world of peace and tolerance. Recently Anthony was included in the Art Now Cornwall show at the Tate St Ives, and has shown in New York and Berlin; in 2008, he designed the cover of The Fall's new album.

Master of the University

Mr Christopher Bell
Mr Christopher Bell
Services to the arts
Christopher Bell is Chorus Director of the Grant Park Chorus, Chicago, USA, Chorusmaster of the Royal Scottish National Orchestra Junior Chorus, the Edinburgh Festival Chorus and the Belfast Philharmonic Choir. He helped form the National Youth Choir of Scotland in 1996 and is its Artistic Director. Educated at Edinburgh University, Christopher was Associate Conductor of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra between 1989 and 1991. Since then he has worked with many of the major orchestras in the UK and Eire. He has directed youth choirs in Aberdeen and Ulster, and was Artistic Director of the Children's Classic Concert series. For his work with singers, and particularly his encouragement of young singers in Scotland, Christopher was awarded a Scotsman of the Year 2001 award for Creative Talent. In 2003, he was awarded the Charles Groves Prize for his contribution to cultural life in Scotland and the rest of the UK.

Ms Olga Camm
Ms Olga Camm
Services to the University
Olga Camm left school in 1933. In the late 1960s she heard about The Open University, which was taking students without A levels being required. She enrolled, taking S100 in 1971. From its inception, she was Chair of Fylde Open University Students' Association (OUSA). She was a life member of OUSA. After graduating in 1977, Olga tried unsuccessfully to gather scattered, informal graduate groups into a federation. Barbara Senior, a member of Fylde, wrote to Vice- Chancellor John Horlock asking for assistance to form an OU graduates' association. The University called a meeting at Walton Hall in December 1985. Olga became Chair of the Steering Group, and in 1989 was elected as the first Chair of the Association of Open University Graduates (AOUG). She was a member of the OU Council from 1986 to 1991. She also represented the OU and AOUG at the Conference of University Convocations (CUC), significantly raising awareness of the OU's qualities. Olga took part in the Association's 2012 AGM and passed away peacefully a few days later on 11th June 2012.

Master of the University

Mr John Dow
Mr John Dow
Photo: Links Media
Services in an area of special concern to the University in Scotland Born in 1954, John finished school in 1968, after which he enjoyed various careers including in the Royal Air Force and the Prison Service. Before retiring because of ill health, he was a senior officer within local government. When having to 'face up to not being able to work', it was suggested to John that he should consider undertaking an Open University course. John feels that this was the beginning of a new journey for him; he believes that being able to undertake this introductory course enabled him to stop feeling useless, and to see opportunity. John actively promotes the involvement of users and carers within social services. He defines success as 'being able to continue on the journey of involvement, gain support to do so for himself and others like him in the knowledge they are valued, key partners'. Continuing this journey towards real influence is the success, not the final destination.

Mr Mike Lowndes
Mr Mike Lowndes
Services to the University
Mike Lowndes was appointed to The Open University in 1971 in the Scottish Region to tutor in technology. Since then, until retirement in 2007, he has been in continuous employment with the OU, tutoring courses in the mathematics, science and technology faculties. Since retiring as Deputy Head of Mechanical Engineering at a Scottish university, Mike has chaired the National Associate Lecturers Committee, where for nearly three years he headed a team guiding ALs through a time of great change for the University. As well as serving on the Academic Board, he represented ALs on a number of important committees, including the AL Staff Development Working Group. Mike has also continued to work on a part-time basis for the Scottish Qualifications Authority. As an expert on assessment, he has been involved in development and quality control of Higher National Certificate and Scottish Vocational Qualifications in colleges and industry throughout Scotland.

Mr Edward Price
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Notable contribution to public services, education and culture
Edward Price, farmer at Frocester Court for most of his adult life, served as a Justice of the Peace from 1965 to 1986. He became interested in local history and archaeology after discovering a Romano-British site on his farm. Participating in its excavation from 1961, he was director from 1978 to 2008, and was highly commended in the Pitt Rivers section of the British Archaeological Awards in 1990. Edward has produced some interim reports, articles on fieldwork and, after retirement, a two-volume report on the excavations. A third is in draft format and the fourth, the development of the present village, was published in 2008. Edward was elected a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London in 1981, and is past president of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society and the Gloucester and District Archaeological Research Group. He was awarded an MBE for services to archaeology in 2008.

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